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Answers

PHILOSOPHY


PHILOSOPHY

  • Philosopher’s Index. Bowling Green: Philosophy Documentation Center, 1967–.Provides abstracts of articles from over 400 philosophy journals as well as anthologies and books published from 1940 to the present. The index is available in print and electronic formats.

  • BioethicsWebhttp://bioethicsweb.ac.ukA guide to reputable Web resources on topics such as genetically modified food, medical ethics, cloning, stem cell research, and animal welfare. Based in the UK, this site is supported by the Wellcome Trust, a nonprofit organization that funds research into human and animal health, and is part of the Resource Discovery Network.
  • Contemporary Philosophy, Critical Theory, and Postmodern Thoughthttp://carbon.cudenver.edu/~mryder/itc_data/postmodern.htmlA compilation of Web-based sources on postmodernism, including important philosophers, background information, and primary texts. The site was created by Martin Ryder of the University of Colorado at Denver.
  • Ethics Updatehttp://ethics.acusd.eduProvides bibliographic essays and links to content on ethics theory, teaching and learning, and applied ethics topics such as euthanasia, animal rights, bioethics, and world hunger. The site includes audio and video files as well as textual information. Edited by Lawrence W. Hinman at the Values Institute, University of San Diego.
  • Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophyhttp://plato.stanford.eduOffers authoritative articles that are updated to reflect changes in the field. Entries are kept current by experts in philosophy and reviewed by an editorial board, based at the Metaphysics Research Lab, Stanford University. Because the project is a work in progress, some topics are not yet covered.
  • World Wide Web Virtual Library: Philosophyhttp://www.bris.ac.uk/Depts/Philosophy/VLMaintained at the University of Bristol in the UK, this site offers a database-driven, annotated listing of reputable Web sites in philosophy. Those of special note are marked “Editor’s Choice.”

  • Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics. Ed. Ruth Chadwick. 4 vols. San Diego: Academic Press, 1998.Provides lengthy, scholarly discussions of the ethical aspects of issues such as affirmative action, animal rights, and genetic screening as well as contemporary views on theories of humanism, hedonism, and utilitarianism.
  • Encyclopedia of Bioethics. Ed. Warren T. Reich. Rev. ed. 5 vols. New York: Macmillan, 1995.Covers issues and controversies in bioethics in lengthy, scholarly articles, each accompanied by a bibliography of key sources. Because bioethics is a rapidly changing field, some of the information may be out of date; be sure to check current sources as well.
  • Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Ed. Paul Edwards. 8 vols. New York: Macmillan, 1967–. With supplement.Offers articles on movements, concepts, and philosophers. Though dated, this work is both scholarly and accessible, so it provides a good starting place for research, particularly on traditional and classical philosophers. For more contemporary approaches, see the Routledge Encyclopedia, at the end of this section.
  • Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy. By Simon Blackburn. New York: Oxford University Press, 1994.Offers succinct definitions of terms in philosophy, primarily Western, and biographical entries on individual philosophers.
  • Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 10 vols. London: Routledge, 1998.The most important current encyclopedia of the field, this work extends the classic Encyclopedia of Philosophy by adding both new topics and approaches to philosophy and also by including new approaches and new research on classical philosophy. New areas covered include philosophical approaches based on feminism, postcolonialism, poststructuralism, deconstruction, and postmodernism. Some libraries may subscribe to an online version of this work.
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    Posted by Jane Campus

    College faculty vote results too close to be determined

    OfferUndetermined.pdf (124 KB)
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    Page 1

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    February 10, 2010
    College faculty vote results too close to determine
    TORONTO – Results of the vote by faculty in Ontario’s 24 community colleges on the employer’s last contract offer are too close to determine whether the offer has been accepted or rejected.
    Faculty have voted 51 per cent to accept the employer’s offer, a margin of just 210 votes. Now at issue is the number of mail-in votes, over 300 ballots, which once received couldchange the vote results. Those results may not be known for up to 10 days or more.
    Ted Montgomery, chair of the OPSEU bargaining team for the faculty, says that the union will have to get a clear determination of the final vote count before any decisions are made.
    “Right now we do not have a clear and final majority either way,” Montgomery said. “Until we know for sure whether our members have accepted or rejected the employer offer, we cannot move forward.”
    Montgomery said that if the offer is ultimately rejected, the union will then determine a new strike date and call on the Colleges to return to the bargaining table to negotiate a fair collective agreement.
    “If rejected, we will ask the employer to immediately resume negotiations,” Montgomery said. “And, failing a negotiated contract, we will again urge the Colleges to submit all outstanding issues to binding arbitration.”
    OPSEU President Warren (Smokey) Thomas says if the eventual outcome is a rejection of the employer’s offer, a strike can still be completely avoided. “We do not want any disruption to the students,” Thomas said. “We have maintained the position all along that if we can’t get an agreement, binding arbitration is how we want to proceed. If the Colleges don’t agree, then they and they alone will be responsible for
    jeopardizing the education of 200,000 Ontario college students.”
    For more information:
    Ted Montgomery, Chair, OPSEU Negotiating Team
    416-578-4255 (cell)
    Don Ford, OPSEU Communications
    416-788-9104

    Posted by Jane Campus