Category Archives: Mould Maker

Seneca College – Canada

A mathematics lecture, apparently about linear...
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The mission of Seneca College of Applied Arts and Technology is to contribute to the Canadian society by being a transformational leader in providing students with career-related education and training. Seneca College has approximately 90,000 part-time and 17,000 full-time students.
The College is a place of opportunities, to make goals a reality. Students can choose from more than 260 careers and receive the academic foundation, workplace experience and practical training needed to succeed. The College also offers co-operative education programs that allow students to gain real work experience.
Seneca College is dedicated to meeting the ever-changing needs of students. This ensures that the curriculum remains relevant for present careers. The College has transfer agreements with educational institutions across Canada and around the globe. Seneca College of Applied Arts and Technology has a dedicated faculty and staff, as well as facilities and…
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Jane Campus
Main Campus
At the Jane Campus / Centre for New Technologies students are registered in pre-apprenticeship programs for Tool and Die Maker, Precision Machining and Mould Maker trades. Seneca College’s online store allows students to purchase goods without having to wait in line at one of the campus bookstores. This online store has items from all Seneca stores, including the computer store. Students can have purchases sent directly to them or they can pick them up in one of the stores….
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Other Campuses:

King Campus
Newnham Campus
Seneca@York Campus
Markham Campus

From:

http://www.studyplaces.com/institute/Seneca+College

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Solidworks Mold Design

before cad-cam
Image by photolupi via Flickr

Solidworks Mold Design ( Kalıp Tasarımı )

http://www.mekatek.tr.gg
Category:  Film & Animation
Tags:  solidworks  mold  cavity  design  kalıp  ayırma  tasarım  dizayn  makina  makine  dassault  system  eğitim  videoları  türkçe  analiz

http://www.mekatek.tr.ggCategory:  Film & AnimationTags:  solidworks  mold  cavity  design  kalıp  ayırma  tasarım  dizayn  makina  makine  dassault  system  eğitim  videoları  türkçe  analiz

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Cost: CENTRE FOR PRECISION SKILL

School of Mechanical Engineering, Minhang Campus
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CENTRE FOR PRECISION SKILLS
Program Sem. Textbooks Equipment Clothing Supplies Transportation Field Trip Total Per Sem.
Mechanical Engineering Technician – Tool Design 1 $550 $700 $200 $35 $1,485.00
2 $250 $250.00
3 $600 $600.00
4 $350 $350.00
Mechanical Techniques – CNC Programming 1 $650 $400 $200 $35 $1,285.00
2 $200 $200.00
Mechanical Techniques (Tool & Die / Mould Making) 1 $550 $700 $200 $35 $1,485.00
2 $250 $250.00
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Youtube: Hot Runner System (4 Cavities)

Hot runner system designed for a multicavity mold ( lowerhousing _mouse)
Category: Education
Tags: hot runner system (4 cavities)

War production workers at the Vilter [Manufact...
Image by The Library of Congress via Flickr

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IAif6ncckzk

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Use AutoCAD 2010

in the autocad world
Image by tamburix via Flickr

Since Conversion from “Autocad 2009 to Autocad 2010” … may not always open, work and/ or load correctly. use AutoCAD 2010

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Book and Supply Costs for 2008-2009

First pocket programmable calculator
Image via Wikipedia

Jane Campus
Book and Supply Costs for 2008-2009

The tuition fee framework is set by the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities. The fees policy of the Ministry states that in addition to the standard tuition fees, there are specific costs which must be borne by the student. These costs include any learning materials, equipment and/or clothing which may be retained by the student. The following is a listing of the books, equipment/materials and/or clothing (if any) which you will be required to obtain, together with an indication of the approximate cost based on the best information available at the time of publication.

Description of Items (applies to all programs):

  • Textbooks include required texts and laboratory manuals.
  • Equipment usually includes electronic calculators, project materials, any supplies that may be kept by the student or any equipment that is required for the program of study.
  • Clothing usually includes laboratory coats, safety glasses and/or other protective clothing.
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What Is: Inverse Cosine

Characterization of the cosine, cotangent, and...
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Inverse Cosine
cos-1
Cos-1
arccos
Arccos
The inverse function of cosine.
Basic idea: To find cos-1 (½), we ask “what angle has cosine equal to ½?” The answer is 60°. As a result we say cos-1 (½) = 60°. In radians this is cos-1 (½) = π/3.
More: There are actually many angles that have cosine equal to ½. We are really asking “what is the simplest, most basic angle that has cosine equal to ½?” As before, the answer is 60°. Thus cos-1 (½) = 60° or cos-1 (½) = π/3.
Details: What is cos-1 (–½)? Do we choose 120°, –120°, 240°, or some other angle? The answer is 120°. With inverse cosine, we select the angle on the top half of the unit circle. Thus cos-1 (–½) = 120° or cos-1 (–½) = 2π/3.
In other words, the range of cos-1 is restricted to [0, 180°] or [0, π].
Note: arccos refers to “arc cosine”, or the radian measure of the arc on a circle corresponding to a given value of cosine.
Technical note: Since none of the six trig functions sine, cosine, tangent, cosecant, secant, and cotangent are one-to-one, their inverses are not functions. Each trig function can have its domain restricted, however, in order to make its inverse a function. Some mathematicians write these restricted trig functions and their inverses with an initial capital letter (e.g. Cos or Cos-1). However, most mathematicians do not follow this practice. This website does not distinguish between capitalized and uncapitalized trig functions.

Inverse Cosinecos-1Cos-1arccosArccos
The inverse function of cosine.
Basic idea: To find cos-1 (½), we ask “what angle has cosine equal to ½?” The answer is 60°. As a result we say cos-1 (½) = 60°. In radians this is cos-1 (½) = π/3.
More: There are actually many angles that have cosine equal to ½. We are really asking “what is the simplest, most basic angle that has cosine equal to ½?” As before, the answer is 60°. Thus cos-1 (½) = 60° or cos-1 (½) = π/3.
Details: What is cos-1 (–½)? Do we choose 120°, –120°, 240°, or some other angle? The answer is 120°. With inverse cosine, we select the angle on the top half of the unit circle. Thus cos-1 (–½) = 120° or cos-1 (–½) = 2π/3.
In other words, the range of cos-1 is restricted to [0, 180°] or [0, π].
Note: arccos refers to “arc cosine”, or the radian measure of the arc on a circle corresponding to a given value of cosine.
Technical note: Since none of the six trig functions sine, cosine, tangent, cosecant, secant, and cotangent are one-to-one, their inverses are not functions. Each trig function can have its domain restricted, however, in order to make its inverse a function. Some mathematicians write these restricted trig functions and their inverses with an initial capital letter (e.g. Cos or Cos-1). However, most mathematicians do not follow this practice. This website does not distinguish between capitalized and uncapitalized trig functions.

From: http://www.mathwords.com/c/cosine_inverse.htm

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