Category Archives: Tutorials

PHILOSOPHY


PHILOSOPHY

  • Philosopher’s Index. Bowling Green: Philosophy Documentation Center, 1967–.Provides abstracts of articles from over 400 philosophy journals as well as anthologies and books published from 1940 to the present. The index is available in print and electronic formats.

  • BioethicsWebhttp://bioethicsweb.ac.ukA guide to reputable Web resources on topics such as genetically modified food, medical ethics, cloning, stem cell research, and animal welfare. Based in the UK, this site is supported by the Wellcome Trust, a nonprofit organization that funds research into human and animal health, and is part of the Resource Discovery Network.
  • Contemporary Philosophy, Critical Theory, and Postmodern Thoughthttp://carbon.cudenver.edu/~mryder/itc_data/postmodern.htmlA compilation of Web-based sources on postmodernism, including important philosophers, background information, and primary texts. The site was created by Martin Ryder of the University of Colorado at Denver.
  • Ethics Updatehttp://ethics.acusd.eduProvides bibliographic essays and links to content on ethics theory, teaching and learning, and applied ethics topics such as euthanasia, animal rights, bioethics, and world hunger. The site includes audio and video files as well as textual information. Edited by Lawrence W. Hinman at the Values Institute, University of San Diego.
  • Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophyhttp://plato.stanford.eduOffers authoritative articles that are updated to reflect changes in the field. Entries are kept current by experts in philosophy and reviewed by an editorial board, based at the Metaphysics Research Lab, Stanford University. Because the project is a work in progress, some topics are not yet covered.
  • World Wide Web Virtual Library: Philosophyhttp://www.bris.ac.uk/Depts/Philosophy/VLMaintained at the University of Bristol in the UK, this site offers a database-driven, annotated listing of reputable Web sites in philosophy. Those of special note are marked “Editor’s Choice.”

  • Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics. Ed. Ruth Chadwick. 4 vols. San Diego: Academic Press, 1998.Provides lengthy, scholarly discussions of the ethical aspects of issues such as affirmative action, animal rights, and genetic screening as well as contemporary views on theories of humanism, hedonism, and utilitarianism.
  • Encyclopedia of Bioethics. Ed. Warren T. Reich. Rev. ed. 5 vols. New York: Macmillan, 1995.Covers issues and controversies in bioethics in lengthy, scholarly articles, each accompanied by a bibliography of key sources. Because bioethics is a rapidly changing field, some of the information may be out of date; be sure to check current sources as well.
  • Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Ed. Paul Edwards. 8 vols. New York: Macmillan, 1967–. With supplement.Offers articles on movements, concepts, and philosophers. Though dated, this work is both scholarly and accessible, so it provides a good starting place for research, particularly on traditional and classical philosophers. For more contemporary approaches, see the Routledge Encyclopedia, at the end of this section.
  • Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy. By Simon Blackburn. New York: Oxford University Press, 1994.Offers succinct definitions of terms in philosophy, primarily Western, and biographical entries on individual philosophers.
  • Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 10 vols. London: Routledge, 1998.The most important current encyclopedia of the field, this work extends the classic Encyclopedia of Philosophy by adding both new topics and approaches to philosophy and also by including new approaches and new research on classical philosophy. New areas covered include philosophical approaches based on feminism, postcolonialism, poststructuralism, deconstruction, and postmodernism. Some libraries may subscribe to an online version of this work.
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    Posted by Jane Campus

    Mathematics: Trigonometric Tables

    Mathematics: Trigonometric Tables


    PI = 3.141592… (approximately 3.1428)
    radians = degress x PI / 180 (deg to rad conversion)
    degress = radians x 180 / PI (rad to deg conversion)
    Rad Deg Sin Cos Tan Csc Sec Cot
    .0000 00 .0000 1.0000 .0000 —– 1.0000 —– 90 1.5707
    .0175 01 .0175 .9998 .0175 57.2987 1.0002 57.2900 89 1.5533
    .0349 02 .0349 .9994 .0349 28.6537 1.0006 28.6363 88 1.5359
    .0524 03 .0523 .9986 .0524 19.1073 1.0014 19.0811 87 1.5184
    .0698 04 .0698 .9976 .0699 14.3356 1.0024 14.3007 86 1.5010
    .0873 05 .0872 .9962 .0875 11.4737 1.0038 11.4301 85 1.4835
    .1047 06 .1045 .9945 .1051 9.5668 1.0055 9.5144 84 1.4661
    .1222 07 .1219 .9925 .1228 8.2055 1.0075 8.1443 83 1.4486
    .1396 08 .1392 .9903 .1405 7.1853 1.0098 7.1154 82 1.4312
    .1571 09 .1564 .9877 .1584 6.3925 1.0125 6.3138 81 1.4137
    .1745 10 .1736 .9848 .1763 5.7588 1.0154 5.6713 80 1.3953
    .1920 11 .1908 .9816 .1944 5.2408 1.0187 5.1446 79 1.3788
    .2094 12 .2079 .9781 .2126 4.8097 1.0223 4.7046 78 1.3614
    .2269 13 .2250 .9744 .2309 4.4454 1.0263 4.3315 77 1.3439
    .2443 14 .2419 .9703 .2493 4.1336 1.0306 4.0108 76 1.3265
    .2618 15 .2588 .9659 .2679 3.8637 1.0353 3.7321 75 1.3090
    .2793 16 .2756 .9613 .2867 3.6280 1.0403 3.4874 74 1.2915
    .2967 17 .2924 .9563 .3057 3.4203 1.0457 3.2709 73 1.2741
    .3142 18 .3090 .9511 .3249 3.2361 1.0515 3.0777 72 1.2566
    .3316 19 .3256 .9455 .3443 3.0716 1.0576 2.9042 71 1.2392
    .3491 20 .3420 .9397 .3640 2.9238 1.0642 2.7475 70 1.2217
    .3665 21 .3584 .9336 .3839 2.7904 1.0711 2.6051 69 1.2043
    .3840 22 .3746 .9272 .4040 2.6695 1.0785 2.4751 68 1.1868
    .4014 23 .3907 .9205 .4245 2.5593 1.0864 2.3559 67 1.1694
    .4189 24 .4067 .9135 .4452 2.4586 1.0946 2.2460 66 1.1519
    .4363 25 .4226 .9063 .4663 2.3662 1.1034 2.1445 65 1.1345
    .4538 26 .4384 .8988 .4877 2.2812 1.1126 2.0503 64 1.1170
    .4712 27 .4540 .8910 .5095 2.2027 1.1223 1.9626 63 1.0996
    .4887 28 .4695 .8829 .5317 2.1301 1.1326 1.8807 62 1.0821
    .5061 29 .4848 .8746 .5543 2.0627 1.1434 1.8040 61 1.0647
    .5236 30 .5000 .8660 .5774 2.0000 1.1547 1.7321 60 1.0472
    .5411 31 .5150 .8572 .6009 1.9416 1.1666 1.6643 59 1.0297
    .5585 32 .5299 .8480 .6249 1.8871 1.1792 1.6003 58 1.0123
    .5760 33 .5446 .8387 .6494 1.8361 1.1924 1.5399 57 .9948
    .5934 34 .5592 .8290 .6745 1.7883 1.2062 1.4826 56 .9774
    .6109 35 .5736 .8192 .7002 1.7434 1.2208 1.4281 55 .9599
    .6283 36 .5878 .8090 .7265 1.7013 1.2361 1.3764 54 .9425
    .6458 37 .6018 .7986 .7536 1.6616 1.2521 1.3270 53 .9250
    .6632 38 .6157 .7880 .7813 1.6243 1.2690 1.2799 52 .9076
    .6807 39 .6293 .7771 .8098 1.5890 1.2868 1.2349 51 .8901
    .6981 40 .6428 .7660 .8391 1.5557 1.3054 1.1918 50 .8727
    .7156 41 .6561 .7547 .8693 1.5243 1.3250 1.1504 49 .8552
    .7330 42 .6691 .7431 .9004 1.4945 1.3456 1.1106 48 .8378
    .7505 43 .6820 .7314 .9325 1.4663 1.3673 1.0724 47 .8203
    .7679 44 .6947 .7193 .9657 1.4396 1.3902 1.0355 46 .8029
    .7854 45 .7071 .7071 1.0000 1.4142 1.4142 1.0000 45 .7854
    Cos Sin Cot Sec Csc Tan Deg Rad
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    Use AutoCAD 2010

    in the autocad world
    Image by tamburix via Flickr

    Since Conversion from “Autocad 2009 to Autocad 2010” … may not always open, work and/ or load correctly. use AutoCAD 2010

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    SOHCAHTOA

    SVG original of :Image:Trigonometry triangle.p...
    Image via Wikipedia

    SOHCAHTOA is a handy way to memorize the follow formulas. especially when you need to know how to compute the sine, cosine, and tangent of an angle.

    SOH stands for Sine equals Opposite over Hypotenuse.

    CAH stands for Cosine equals Adjacent over Hypotenuse.

    TOA stands for Tangent equals Opposite over Adjacent.

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    What Is: Inverse Cosine

    Characterization of the cosine, cotangent, and...
    Image via Wikipedia
    Inverse Cosine
    cos-1
    Cos-1
    arccos
    Arccos
    The inverse function of cosine.
    Basic idea: To find cos-1 (½), we ask “what angle has cosine equal to ½?” The answer is 60°. As a result we say cos-1 (½) = 60°. In radians this is cos-1 (½) = π/3.
    More: There are actually many angles that have cosine equal to ½. We are really asking “what is the simplest, most basic angle that has cosine equal to ½?” As before, the answer is 60°. Thus cos-1 (½) = 60° or cos-1 (½) = π/3.
    Details: What is cos-1 (–½)? Do we choose 120°, –120°, 240°, or some other angle? The answer is 120°. With inverse cosine, we select the angle on the top half of the unit circle. Thus cos-1 (–½) = 120° or cos-1 (–½) = 2π/3.
    In other words, the range of cos-1 is restricted to [0, 180°] or [0, π].
    Note: arccos refers to “arc cosine”, or the radian measure of the arc on a circle corresponding to a given value of cosine.
    Technical note: Since none of the six trig functions sine, cosine, tangent, cosecant, secant, and cotangent are one-to-one, their inverses are not functions. Each trig function can have its domain restricted, however, in order to make its inverse a function. Some mathematicians write these restricted trig functions and their inverses with an initial capital letter (e.g. Cos or Cos-1). However, most mathematicians do not follow this practice. This website does not distinguish between capitalized and uncapitalized trig functions.

    Inverse Cosinecos-1Cos-1arccosArccos
    The inverse function of cosine.
    Basic idea: To find cos-1 (½), we ask “what angle has cosine equal to ½?” The answer is 60°. As a result we say cos-1 (½) = 60°. In radians this is cos-1 (½) = π/3.
    More: There are actually many angles that have cosine equal to ½. We are really asking “what is the simplest, most basic angle that has cosine equal to ½?” As before, the answer is 60°. Thus cos-1 (½) = 60° or cos-1 (½) = π/3.
    Details: What is cos-1 (–½)? Do we choose 120°, –120°, 240°, or some other angle? The answer is 120°. With inverse cosine, we select the angle on the top half of the unit circle. Thus cos-1 (–½) = 120° or cos-1 (–½) = 2π/3.
    In other words, the range of cos-1 is restricted to [0, 180°] or [0, π].
    Note: arccos refers to “arc cosine”, or the radian measure of the arc on a circle corresponding to a given value of cosine.
    Technical note: Since none of the six trig functions sine, cosine, tangent, cosecant, secant, and cotangent are one-to-one, their inverses are not functions. Each trig function can have its domain restricted, however, in order to make its inverse a function. Some mathematicians write these restricted trig functions and their inverses with an initial capital letter (e.g. Cos or Cos-1). However, most mathematicians do not follow this practice. This website does not distinguish between capitalized and uncapitalized trig functions.

    From: http://www.mathwords.com/c/cosine_inverse.htm

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